Fair Cecily, and other fair-weather friends

June 29, 2014

  All I want is the best of everything and there’s very little of that left. Never in the history of fashion has so little material been raised so high to reveal so much that needs to be covered so badly. What is elegance? Soap and water! …quotes by Cecil Beaton   I have an […]

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An Ephemeral Awareness — Death and the Coming of War

June 21, 2014

When we arrived in Lagos, Nigeria, in January, 1966, one of the most unusual thing that we saw were tanks in the streets and soldiers behind sand bags around government buildings.  In the following days we learned that some government officials, senior military leaders and the Sultan of Sokoto had been killed during a coup […]

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Machu Picchu — “The First Tourist”

June 9, 2014

      “The Explorer” by Rudyard Kipling, “Something lost behind the Ranges.  Lost and waiting for you. Go!” The Boulevardiers have been to the mountain, and climbed it. Machu Picchu, the Old Peak…and Huayna Picchu, the New Peak, to be exact. Sources noted below have reviewed its “discovery”. There is no clear and definitive […]

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Black Mountain College ~ America’s Most Creative Art School

May 10, 2014

The New York Times has titled Black Mountain College as one of “six nodes of progressive culture in America.”  Founded in 1933 by John Andrew Rice,  there were innumerable renowned artists that pasted through these hallowed halls for such a  limited period of existence, including Robert Rauschenberg, Ben Shahn, and Joseph Albers — who brought the […]

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Whitney Biennial ~ a meaningful surfeit

April 14, 2014

There was a time when the Whitney Biennial was the much-anticipated barometer of the state of American art…   Whether praised or reviled, everyone could be counted on to have an opinion. This year, as has been the case for some time, the Biennial is just another blur in the bombardment of art as excess […]

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Ironing One’s Shoelaces

April 1, 2014

  Do not trouble yourself much to get new things, whether clothes or friends…. Sell your clothes and keep your thoughts.  ~Henry David Thoreau Vintage has always been at the top of my list, the visual, touch, feel, quality. I would rather spend hours, weeks, months, years amidst the old wood cases of museum costume […]

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Laces of The Boot — Campania, Italy

February 25, 2014

    The Cape of Palinuro is a delicious slice of timeless travel, it is a sight to behold along the Cilento coast…we hesitate a bit in saying this, as it is sort of a secret…   According to Virgil´s ancient legend, Aeneas´ unfortunate helmsman Palinuro fell overboard close to the coast, giving his name […]

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Да мы будет смотреть за — Sochi Olympics 2014, Yes we will be watching!

February 7, 2014

    “Жаркие. Зимние. Твои,” Translation: “Hot. Cool. Yours.”   OK, Boulevardiers & curmudgeons unite. Enough griping about the Sochi Olympics (scary sad story here from the Atlantic). Of course we are red, white & blue, through & through, and starting tonight, we will be watching with pride. Olympic events give us an opportunity to […]

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Gian Lorenzo BERNINI ~ The Great Sculptor

January 26, 2014

~ Gian Lorenzo BERNINI ~   “He is so adept at imitating, without affectation, what was most perfect in nature that anyone who studied his works was left in doubt as to which was greater, his artistry or his mastery in hiding it.” Domenico An artist of such renown, that Gian Lorenzo Bernini is synonymous […]

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David Foster Wallace — Being A Ghost

January 6, 2014

For the writer, David Foster Wallace, “every love story is a ghost story”, because for David Foster Wallace, being a person was like being a ghost.     David Foster Wallace suffered extreme self-consciousness, day in and day out.  He obsessed about sweating, brushed his teeth and gargled for 45 minutes at a time, mixed […]

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KIM STEELE’S MACHINE AGE

December 1, 2013

~ From ~ The New York Times, Sunday Review, EXPOSURES, December 1, 2013 “MACHINE AGE” by The Boulevardiers Founder & Publisher ~ Photographer KIM STEELE ~ Form and function has always fascinated me.  Turning structure into form has been my goal for almost forty years.  Fascinated by architecture, as well as industry, I am ever drawn to capture […]

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Bell Labs — Our Scientific Heritage

November 11, 2013

In 1880, the French government awarded Alexander Graham Bell the Volta Prize of 50,000 francs (approximately US$10,000 at that time), about $250,000 in current dollars. His telephone was the invention that won the award, which he used to found the Volta Laboratory, along with Sumner Tainter and Bell’s cousin Chichester Bell.         The Volta Laboratory and the Volta Bureau […]

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Skulls & Sarnies

November 10, 2013

  I’m an Anthropologist…and a BioArchaeologist. I’ve been all blood & guts for as long as my family & colleagues can remember, in a good way. Pursuing my dreams has been exciting, challenging, and sometimes bewildering. At this time of year, Halloween and all the carnivorous holidays, my truest colors emerge. The evolution of Celtic […]

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“If I can’t dance to it, it’s not my revolution…”

October 28, 2013

                I’m no Anarchist…but I do love the title quote of this post, from Emma Goldman, on the right, smoking a pipe on the beach.       From The Stanford Dictionary of Philosophy: The definition of art is controversial in contemporary philosophy. Whether art can be defined […]

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The Den of the Lioness — Peggy Guggenheim

October 7, 2013

The year is 1958.  Peggy Guggenheim is hosting yet another one of her famous cocktail parties to celebrate the opening of the Venice Biennale.  The previous weeks proved daunting for the art collector.  She has begun an overdue facelift to her garden which seemed too grandiose to be completed in time for the celebration. Peggy decided […]

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City – of solace(ds), of soles also.

September 29, 2013

Preamble: Heather Marcelle Crickenberger writes: “Even if [Benjamin’s] .. compositional practice is merely “the working of quotations into the framework of montage” .., his form .. may still be seen as “a discontinuous presentation deliberately opposed to traditional modes of argument”  .. through the “medium” of the “blinks.” These “blinks” are a textual means of […]

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Sebastião Salgado: Genesis, An Exhibit and a Book — Rome

September 13, 2013

  Black and White photography has long lingered in the background of media vultures, especially advertising, e.g. Bruce Weber, et al. Most point and shoot cameras and applications (Photoshop Elements which comes with cameras) have conversions to B/W or Sepia color modes.  Instagram, the industry leader, for now, offers alterations of images to make inferior, […]

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James Bond REMF: Boulevardier, Rear Echelon Mother!$&%*r

August 15, 2013

  Ian Fleming’s shadowy career in Britain’s clandestine services during WWII spawned an impressive collection of essays, books, the most successful movie franchise in history, and a large body of erroneous assumptions. Blurry lines between Fleming’s actual life and his writings are perhaps the most fascinating aspect of the entire 50-year Bond phenomenon.   Many […]

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Baldassare Castiglione, Boulevardier ~ “Don’t Be Disgusting!”

August 1, 2013

“Practise in everything a certain nonchalance that shall conceal design and show that what is done and said is done without effort and almost without thought.” ~Baldassare Castiglione   Some of my favorite animals on earth are Italian. Food for thought… From New Advent: Baldassare Castiglione, an Italian prose-writer, born at Casatico, near Mantua, 6 […]

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Mark Birley Boulevardier ~ ‘His things were thrown to the wolves’

July 8, 2013

An Englishman went into a hardware store and asked to buy a sink. “Would you like one with a plug?” asked the assistant. “Don’t tell me they’ve gone electric,” said the Englishman. I hate to shop…unless I can do it with a click or a snipe. Although my reputation preceedes and follows me for finding the […]

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The Artistry of the Voice

June 25, 2013

While traversing the boulevards of San Francisco, Los Angeles, or New York, you might brush by someone whose face you have never seen before, but whose voice you would most certainly recognize–though you might not be able to place right away.   These voices live among us, voices whose tones and timbres elevate the spoken […]

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Allen Ginsberg: poet not photographer

June 1, 2013

ALLEN GINSBERG  “BEAT MEMORIES”  SAN FRANCISCO Contemporary Jewish Museum  ~  May 23 – September 8, 2013     Just across town from the Jewish Museum is the showing of Garry Winogrand, the complete opposite of Allen Ginsberg, he, Allen, is a story-teller, not a photographer.  A documentation of the era and the sensibility.         […]

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Mark di Suvero’s Mother Peace

May 27, 2013

      Welcome to San Francisco — Mark di Suvero                             Mark di Suvero at Crissy Field is presented by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) in partnership with the National Park Service and the Golden Gate National Parks […]

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You are what you eat…On…

May 19, 2013

Wedding season has reminded me all about tableware. Decisions, decisions! Is fabulous tableware a luxury, a necessity…is it even important? If nothing else, it is a visual Garden of Eden. For all you Boulevardiers and Gourmands, some inspiration! TABLEWARE 101:   From WIKIPEDIA: The first known use of the term tableware was in 1766, dinnerware […]

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Mirroring Tarkovsky

May 15, 2013

  Russian Filmaker Andrei Tarkovsky, who passed away in 1986 in Paris, is most known for his films Andrei Rublev (1966), Solaris (1972), The Mirror (1975) and Stalker (1979).  Tarkovsky’s first feature film was Ivan’s Childhood in 1962 which earned him international acclaim and was awarded the Golden Lion at the Venice Film festival in […]

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Philip Guston : “It was too much of a painting.”

May 6, 2013

Philip Guston: A Centennial Exhibition   McKee Gallery, NYC, March 2nd – April 20th 2013 Few artists today are more revered by other artists, painters especially, than Philip Guston, (1913-1980). It was not always thus. For a decade or so, way back in the 70’s, no painter was more divisive than Guston. At a time […]

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Garry Winogrand – Master of Chaos

April 22, 2013

GARRY WINOGRAND                                                                     APRIL 2013   Garry’s work is not about story telling or documenting his surroundings; it’s about not story telling.     The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (until museum closure on June 2, 2013 for renovations for three years) is hosting the largest retrospective in twenty-five years of Winogrand’s work.  If […]

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“You can’t be a Nice Nelly and take news pictures” …Wegee

April 14, 2013

~In a city already replete with imagery, this new contribution adds another rich layer… from the New York City Department of Records~   “Welcome to the New York City Municipal Archives Online Gallery of over 870,000 images. Selected from the world-class historical collections of the Archives, most of these unique photographs, maps, motion picture and […]

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“I’m not a dictator. It’s just that I have a grumpy face.”

March 28, 2013

“A child who does not play is not a child, but the man who doesn’t play has lost forever the child who lived in him and who he will miss terribly.” Pablo Neruda Traveling from “grumpy” (top ten list of understatements of the 20th century) Augosto Pinochet, and landing on playful Pablo Neruda, yes, you’re […]

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Avant Jazz, or whatever you want to call it

March 17, 2013

    Returning to Gotham this past December following a year of living in Hong Kong, the thing I longed for most was getting back to the intense NY music scene…   So the day we returned, thoroughly jet lagged, we nonetheless lugged ourselves up to the Japan Society to hear NY’s fiercest New Music […]

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Let them Eat Oysters, and preserve the Planet!

March 7, 2013

  From The Boulevardiers Founder & Publisher…Kim Steele I have been a passionate aquaculture conservationist for years, having grown up in Seattle. I grew up at Oyster Bars with my Dad, and developed a life long passion for crabs — which I have eaten world-wide!  A recent meeting with former Secretary of the Interior, Ken […]

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Bangles via Guns (and the power of making)

March 1, 2013

  Sometimes inspiration comes at me from different directions. And btw, what is so funny ’bout Peace, Love and Understanding?           While reading the NYTimes Runway Blog… “Jessica Mindich is a jewelry designer who has begun transforming recycled pistols, rifles and shotguns from Newark into a line of sleek bangle bracelets. […]

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Boulevardiers & Fools…

February 2, 2013

      There was an Old Man of Nantucket Who kept all his cash in a bucket His daughter, named Nan, Ran away with a man— And, as for the bucket, Nantucket     Yahoo Canada! reports: Earth’s magnetic field long overdue for a reversal that could end our current way of life. Doom […]

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Garden of 3D Earthly Delights

January 18, 2013

  Somewhere along my way in the past year, I found my way to the Dassault Systèmes website. Now I can’t stop visiting. I think I am addicted. PLM, yes PLM, Product Lifecycle Management, Dassault applies this out on the bleeding edge to everything from Aerospace to fashion design, and if you haven’t heard about their […]

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Happy & Well-Designed Holidays!

December 30, 2012

Salk Institute, designed by Louis Kahn 1959 — 1965 photograph by Kim Steele, 11.2012 Dear Boulevardiers: The 5,125 year-long Mayan Calendar was to stop on Dec. 21st, 2012? Like all mercurial changes, we adapt. Join Us in the Chorus…Bien Sûr Que Non!  Afterward, The Boulevardiers are reminiscing about our lively engagement with our readers in […]

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Poets Drown in Lakes…Bob Dylan

December 19, 2012

  DYLAN: “It’s called tradition, and that is what I deal in. Traditional, with a capital T.” The Rolling Stone Interview, September 27, 2012: One wouldn’t expect to hear that from Bob Dylan, the man who wrote Desolation Row, Sad Eyed Lady of the Lowlands, and Visions of Johanna. He is the archetype Van Gogh […]

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Richard Serra — “I Will Renounce My Citizenship and Move to France”

November 29, 2012

      RICHARD SERRA has been the bad boy for forty years. His rugged demeanor and brutualist sculptures set him as the bully in the playground of the art world. My first personal encounter with Serra was for an assignment to photograph him and his controversial sculpture, ‘Tilted Arc’ in the Federal Plaza, in lower […]

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